Archive

May 11th, 2009

Robert Redford weighs in on energy bill for Salt Lake City Tribune

11
May
robert-redford-200px.jpg

In the we-could-not-have-said-it-better ourselves category: Actor, director and long time environmentalist Robert Redford authored a compelling op-ed for the Salt Lake City Tribune, as part of the effort to urge lawmakers, including Utah’s Rep. Jim Matheson to support a strong clean energy bill. Redford writes:

Right now Congress is working on a landmark clean-energy jobs plan that would boost the amount of wind, solar and other clean energy our country produces. The American Clean Energy and Security Act will also make our vehicles, appliances and buildings more efficient, and update our antiquated electricity grid.

Our investments in clean energy and efficiency today will pay dividends for generations. They will create good, family-sustaining jobs that can't be shipped overseas, and they will lower energy prices in the long run. They will reduce energy dependence and global-warming pollution, and make our economy more competitive.

It's true that the economic and environmental challenges we confront are serious. But Americans have never encountered a challenge of any kind that we couldn't overcome by working together and applying our ingenuity.

I’ve been hoping that Redford’s op-ed might at least move some of the female lawmakers!

Share |

May 8th

Climate blogs and news roundup: NYT weighs in, climate trauma, Ted Glick

8
May

As you would expect, climate news and the blogosphere this week have been dominated by discussion of the Waxman-Markey clean energy and climate bill. In the face of growing attempts to weaken the bill, the New York Times weighs in with a timely and generally positive editorial about the bill. A couple of choice quotes:

Mr. Obama told Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee to work out a consensus, which they must do. Though flawed, the bill is an honorable start on a problem too long neglected. Fix it, but get on with it, in the certain knowledge that failure to act would almost certainly doom comprehensive climate change legislation for this year and, probably, for this Congress.

. . . . .

The bill deliberately left big questions open for discussion, and as negotiations proceed, Mr. Waxman and Mr. Markey must resist crippling concessions. One debate is whether companies should get the allowances the government will assign to polluters for free or whether they should pay for them at an auction.
Share |

Don't worry, "we've got 41 Years"

8
May
ted-glick-200px.jpg

The following is a guest post by veteran climat activist Ted Glick, cross-posted from the CCAN Blog. -- Luis

“This is 2009. We’ve got 41 years in this deal, and we shouldn’t be so worried about the first 10 years.”

Congressman Mike Doyle, Environment and Energy Daily, May 7, 2009

I had no plans yesterday morning as I woke up and turned on my computer to spend the afternoon in the D.C. office of Congressman Mike Doyle. But then I read this line in an article on the status of efforts to cobble together a piece of climate legislation in the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

I remember my physical reaction as I read these words, my head shaking back and forth, some trembling and an upwelling of deep, livid anger. “This is the last straw,” I remember thinking.

Share |

May 7th

Van Jones among Time Magazine's Top 100

7
May
van-jones-smile-200px.jpg

This post comes from our Sidwell Friends School intern Florencia Foxley -- Garth

Green jobs champion and former 1Sky board member Van Jones was recently named one of Time Magazine’s 2009 most influential people.

Share |

Let's pray this works: Religious leaders join to urge action on a clean energy bill

7
May

Prominent religious, military and Congressional leaders are joining together to advocate that the U.S. take legislative action on climate change. A poll released by Faith in Public Life reveals that a majority of Americans, including Catholics and white evangelicals, see the connection between addressing climate change, poverty, and national security. Congress is currently debating an energy bill that would combat the causes of climate change and protect those most vulnerable to its effects. The American Values Network is airing this powerful radio ad. You can listen to it by clicking the pink arrow here. In the ad, Rev. Joel Hunter of the Northland Church in Florida delivers this message:

As our seas rise, crops wither, and rivers run dry, God's creation cries out for relief. The failure to answer the calling to be good stewards has consequences. The destabilizing effect of climate change will hit the poor the hardest, and it also threatens our national security, our economic prosperity, and our children's future. Yet no matter how bleak things appear, redemption is always possible. So people of faith are speaking out… a great assembly of Christian pastors and churches and America's military leaders are demanding that Congress passes a climate bill that creates jobs, reduces our dependence on foreign oil, and especially protects vulnerable families and communities at home and abroad who are most hurt by climate change. The time for action is now.
Share |

Climate Precinct Captains hit their marks in April

7
May
CPC-launch-200px.jpg

1Sky's Climate Precinct Captains (CPCs) really stepped up to the plate during the April congressional recess. Throughout the country, we collectively organized nearly thirty town halls in collaboration with Focus the Nation and many other groups.

We would be nowhere without them. The 1Sky community produced more than 1,800 actions in April -- from drop-offs to lobby visits to large-scale events. They are an impressive movement and we feel their impact on a day-to-day basis as we begin pushing for a strong climate bill in Congress.

Share |

May 6th

Victory! No more coal at the Capitol Power Plant

6
May

Remember that march to the Capitol Power Plant organized by Capitol Climate Action? Here's the kind of victory that well-organized and passionate action can achieve:

The 99-year-old Capitol Power Plant, which provides steam for heat and hot water in congressional buildings, is ending its distinction of being the only coal-burning facility in the District of Columbia.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said Friday that the switch to natural gas as the sole fuel source used at the plant was part of their efforts to reduce the carbon pollution impact of Congress on the nation's capital.

"The Congress of the United States should not only be a model for the nation, but also a good neighbor," Pelosi said.

Share |

WashPost must-read: The Cost of Climate Inaction

6
May
washington-post-logo-200px.jpg

In today’s Washington Post, economist Kristen Sheeran and Ceres’ Mindy Lubber, highlight a key point in the economic argument for a change from a fossil fuel dependent economy to an economy that runs on clean energy. They make a compelling case in The Cost of Climate Inaction that economic analyses of energy legislation must consider the costs of inaction:

The real cost of carbon emissions is far from zero. Each new scientific report brings proof of a changing climate that promises to disrupt agricultural patterns, set off a scramble for dwindling resources, raise sea levels, propel population shifts and require massive emergency spending as we try to react to the growing crises. These are the costs of inaction.”

The whole thing is a must-read, and worth passing on.

Share |

Waxman/Markey clean energy bill will go straight to full E&C Committee

6
May

The latest on the Waxman-Markey clean energy jobs bill from the subscripton-only Environment & Energy Daily:

House Energy and Commerce Chairman Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) said today that he will bypass regular order on a major climate change and energy bill and mark up the legislation before the entire 59-member panel.

The change in plans means the Energy and Environment Subcommittee will not mark up the bill as previously scheduled. Waxman and subcommittee Chairman Ed Markey (D-Mass.) planned to hold a subcommittee markup beginning last week, but ongoing intra-party negotiations have yet to produce a new draft bill.

The full committee markup will not begin until next week at the earliest, Waxman told reporters this afternoon. The lawmaker plans to report the bill by the Memorial Day recess.

So if your representative is part of this committee, why not start calling now?

Share |

May 5th

Climate Precinct Captains in the New York Times

5
May
nyt-logo-200px.jpg

Climate Precinct Captains were extremely active in April, pressing decision makers -- both in person and on the phone -- to strengthen the big clean energy bill making its way through Congress. And now, the mainstream media is taking notice! From Climate Wire via the New York Times:

….green-jobs promoter 1Sky started a program in February called Climate Precinct Captains to get volunteers roaming the streets in search of like-minded activists. During marathon hearings in April about the House bill, more than 1,500 such captains and recruits flooded Congress with phone call after phone call.

"'We're leveling the money playing field,’ said Gillian Caldwell, campaign director for 1Sky."

Over 1,160 calls so far, actually. Not that we're counting or anything...

We don't have the millions of dollars that big polluters can spend in lobbyists and disinformation, but we have the power of a grassroots movement that's growing every day. Across the country, Climate Precinct Captains (CPCs) are stepping up in their communities, playing a critical role in building one of the strongest and fastest-growing grassroots movements in history. With the MSM increasingly taking notice of this movement, it's the prefect time for you to get involved. Find out more by visiting the Climate Precinct Captains page today.

Share |