The Skywriter

Climate Blogs this week: Ike, Corruption and Greening NYC--9/12

12
Sep

Climate Blogs this week: Ike, Corruption and Greening NYC--9/12

For the past few weeks Think Progress’ Wonk Room has been blogging extensively about the link between global warming and more severe storms. This week, hundreds of thousands of people have begun fleeing the gulf coast in preparation for 100 mph winds and storm surges as high as 20 ft. Tropical storm blogger Dr. Jeff Masters reports:

Ike is now larger than Katrina was, both in its radius of tropical storm force winds–275 miles–and in it radius of hurricane force winds–115 miles. For comparison, Katrina’s tropical storm and hurricane force winds extended out 230 and 105 miles, respectively. Ike’s huge wind field has put an extraordinarily large volume of ocean water in motion. When this swirling column of water hits the shallow waters of the Continental Shelf, it will be be forced up into a large storm surge which will probably rival the massive storm surge of Hurricane Carla of 1961. Carla was a Category 4 hurricane with 145 mph winds at landfall…

Hopefully Congress and our President will take more action to stop global warming considering all the hurricanes we’ve already had this month. For crying out loud, they owe us one after news leaked this week that big oil is (literally) in bed with our government officials. Climate Progress reports:

The alleged transgressions involve 13 Interior Department employees in Denver and Washington. Their alleged improprieties include rigging contracts, working part-time as private oil consultants, and having sexual relationships with - and accepting golf and ski trips and dinners from - oil company employees, according to three reports released Wednesday by the Interior Department’s inspector general Earl Devaney.

Let’s give the power to the youth! This week the Energy Action Coalition launched Power Vote, a national movement mobilizing the youth to vote for the environment and demand that our elected officials take a stance to stop global warming! Kate Sheppard from Grist.org reports:

The nonpartisan campaign aims to put curbing emissions, leading in clean energy, and creating green jobs on the presidential agenda this election, focusing on the "Millennial Generation" of 18- to 30-year-olds.

Jessy Tolkan, the co-director of the Energy Action Coalition said,

We want to make it very clear that as one-quarter of the voting population, if you are on the ballot this fall, you need the youth vote to win, and winning the youth vote means addressing actual solutions to global climate change.

Are you still burning fossil fuels in order to drop your kids off at school? Well, if i told you there was a way to skip your daily gym workout, save money and stop global warming what would you say? I'm not pulling your leg. Mothers across Japan are using the mamachari bicycle to transport their children and groceries around town. Treehugger.com reports:

The mamachari has become something of a cultural icon in a country that tries to be more energy-efficient and where housewives generally hold the purse. Trying to reduce your gasolin expenditures? Consider getting a mamachari!

Check out this video:

The mamachari might not be that out of touch with American culture. This week Michael Bloomberg, the mayor of New York City announced his plan to reinvent the skyline through the addition of wind turbines. Our friends at Celsias.com, an online social network and blog for climate activists reports:

Bloomberg is seeking the advice of private companies and investors about how the windmill plan could be put into action. After a series of devastating blackouts over the years, New York would greatly benefit from being removed from America's overextended power grid. While Bloomberg didn't go into specifics about which skyscrapers and bridges would boast the windmills, city officials and property owners would have to work together to determine which buildings would best be suited for the integration.

What did we miss? Let us know in our comments section!

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