The Skywriter

Rain wouldn't stop the "Storm" in New Hampshire

22
Apr

Rain wouldn't stop the "Storm" in New Hampshire

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By Elaine Bello, a volunteer 1Sky Regional Coordinator in New Hampshire. -- Luis

Having been involved with 1Sky for many months now, I have already participated in several events. As a new Regional Coordinator, my first action came last week on April 16th, in the form of a demonstration called “The Storm”. Our team gathered 21 people in front of New Hampshire Senator Judd Gregg’s state office to make sure he knows about our hopes for the climate bill.

The night before, our weather turned bad. After weeks of unseasonable heat and sunshine, it had begun to rain. This was not just a mellow spring rain, but a slushy mix of bone chilling, dreary, frozen pellets. As I headed to our appointed meeting place, I had little hope that all those phone calls, emails and web posts would bring out the number of people we hoped would come.

Later, when participants began to arrive, I was pleasantly surprised to see just how passionate the group really is. Twenty-one in all, we made quite a stir on North Main Street with our truckload of home-made posters and not one, but four photographers snapping photos. One was even from the press. (See pics from the event below or on Flickr.)

Previous events have brought 5 – 10 people, sometimes only 3. I sense that our movement is growing. People must genuinely be concerned for so many to have to traveled so far and stand out in the freezing rain in order to make a point. Our opinions were made clear when a small contingent was received by one of the Senator's aides.

Our spokesperson started by urging Senator Gregg to stand strong on climate legislation. We asked that he help to strengthen, not weaken the climate bill. We asked him to withdraw his support for the Murkowski amendment and instead to help us create jobs through the development of programs to support safe and environmentally sound power generation. We let him know of our distaste for dirty fuels, dependency upon foreign oil and the dangers of nuclear power.

We left with high hopes for future events as our numbers seem to be growing. It might just be that our legislators will listen as more and more responsible people brave the elements to be heard.

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