Current Events

Katrina

29
Aug
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Today we observe a grim anniversary in our history. On the morning of August 28, 2005, at 6:10 a.m., Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the coast of Louisiana, packing devastating winds of up to 125 mph. Katrina affected communities from Florida to Mississippi, but it was in New Orleans that the storm left its cruelest footprint: 1,464 dead, more than 500,000 displaced (the largest population displacement in American history since the Civil War), over $22 billion in property damage, and an entire American city under water. The truly frightening prospect, however, is that thanks to global warming, Katrina may have been just a preview of things to come.

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Sorry Big Oil, Americans Want Climate Action. Really.

26
Aug

Americans would love to do something about climate change but they are simply not willing to pay higher electricity bills. Right? … Right? Well that’s what many politicians would have us believe as they justify their continued inaction. Turns out it just isn’t true.

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Climate blogs this week: high gas grices, oil sands, and wasting water -- 8/22

22
Aug

Here are a few of the week's biggest climate blog stories that didn't make it into the mainstream media.

It’s a little worrisome when Bill Gates and Warren Buffett (2 out of the 3 richest men in the world) tour the oil sands of Alberta and express their interest in investing in one of the world’s dirtiest sources of petroleum. Jake Brewer on It’s Getting Hot In Here reports:

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This week's climate news: states and cities tackle the climate challenge -- 8/22

22
Aug

This week we find a number of stories that show a clear pattern: In the absence of meaningful action at the federal level, states and cities are taking matters into their own hands to deal with climate change.

California, for example, is about to pass a groundbreaking law that would cut CO2 emissions by curbing sprawl:

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This week's climate news: small cars, big panels, closed doors -- 8/15

15
Aug
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Bigger isn’t always better, but in China, bigger is never better, at least in terms of automobiles. China is raising taxes on big cars and reducing them for smaller cars, starting September 1st, to save energy and reduce pollution. With rising global prices of oil, this move is an attempt to alleviate the costs for China’s oil producers and refiners. Zhong Shi, a Beijing-based industrial analyst, said:

The tax move is a good first step for the country toward an energy efficient and environmentally friendly economy.

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Climate blogs this week: clean coal, driving less, and fossil fuel-free homes--8/15

15
Aug

Here are some of this week's biggest climate blog stories that didn't make it into the mainstream media.

  • There are two words that make every climate organizers cringe: clean coal. Thankfully, a new peer-reviewed study was released this week exposing the increased energy needed for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) so we can finally put this concept to rest…hopefully.

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DC Area: Ditch your Smartrip and get a SmartBike

13
Aug
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Are you tired of paying for gas and hard-pressed to find a decent parking space nowadays? Do you want to enjoy this unseasonably cool August weather while simultaneously reducing your green house gas emissions? Your wait is over! Today, history was made in the District of Columbia with the launching of the first public bike-sharing program in the United States.

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The Renewables Revolution

12
Aug

We have all heard of the benefits of investing at a young age and having your money work for you, but do you ever feel as if the only stocks that perform well are the corrupt, environmentally unfriendly corporations? Well, the tables may be turning as companies around the world slowly begin to end their dependency on fossil fuels and start shifting towards the economic prosperity of a green economy. And now there are reasons to believe that investing in clean energy systems may not only help to reduce green house gas emissions, but also deepen your own pockets.

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This Week's Climate News: Protests, Military Greening, and Kangaroo Meat-- 8/8

8
Aug

Here are some of this week's climate news stories that didn't make it onto the mainstream media teleprompters.

Environmentalists, lawmakers, and academics have been protesting the building of the U.K.’s first new coal-fired plant in 30 years in a week-long Climate Camp. If built, this coal plant would emit at least 60 million tons of CO2/year, as well as pave the way for six more coal-fired plants.

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Why we must take on Gore’s challenge

7
Aug
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Although many weeks have passed since Al Gore’s groundbreaking speech announcing his bold, new energy plan for America—shifting to 100% renewable and clean energy sources within the next 10 years—it’s still producing aftershocks around the globe.

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